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Masters' Pieces by Artemide: lights & lamps

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Masters' Pieces
Artemide
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5 w
RRP*€ 1.780,-15 %
€ 1.513,-
5 w
RRP*€ 1.080,-15 %
€ 918,-
5 w
RRP*€ 980,-15 %
€ 833,-
5 w
RRP*€ 330,-15 %
€ 280,50
5 w
RRP*€ 2.080,-15 %
€ 1.768,-
5 w
RRP*€ 4.450,-15 %
€ 3.782,50
24 h
RRP*€ 1.050,-15 %
€ 892,50
2 w
RRP*€ 970,-15 %
€ 824,50
5 w
RRP*€ 950,-15 %
€ 807,50
Your selection:   
9 results
Masters' Pieces
Artemide
9 results
Sort by:
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Artemide Masters Pieces

Timeless masters pieces by renowned architects and designers

The Artemide Masters Pieces include an exquisite selection of lights that were created by renowned architects and designers. The development history dates back to the year 1959 when Sergio Mazza created the Alfa Tavolo table lamp as the first light for the Italian company Artemide. Due to its extraordinary design – the lampshade is made of serrated crystal glass which is not as usually located at the top but in the middle section and the base is made of fine marble – it represented a new evolutionary stage in the construction of lights.

The Artemide Masters Pieces not only include everlasting classics but also modern master pieces. One of them is the brainchild of Zaha Hadid. The British architect, professor of architecture and designer with Iraqi origin created the Genesy light in 2009. The large floor lamp looks like a solidified creature from a distant planet, so that this piece reflects the artist’s preference for a natural design language. The Artemide Masters Pieces collection also consists of many works that are exhibited in famous museums.

This includes, for instance, the Patroclo. This light which is literally a fusion of a metal mesh and a hand-blown glass located on the inside is, among other things, part of the Twentieth Century Design Collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. The Artemide Masters Pieces Boalum and Pipe were exhibits as well. The first one, a creation by Gianfranco Frattini from 1970, fascinates by its snake-like shape and flexibility associated with it. The latter Artemide Masters Pieces member is also a prime example in terms of flexibility: the pendant light with a transparent light head, a joint project of the architects Herzig & de Meuron, is manufactured from a flexible steel tube which can be adjusted as required. The light that is emitted in small bundles cuts a great figure, for instance, above a counter or a bar.
 

Artemide Masters Pieces: lights as an expression of a design approach

A further representative of the Artemide Masters Pieces is the Shogun Tavolo. This table light by Mario Botta first saw the light of day in 1986 and was also exhibited in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Due to the striped pole and the perforated lampshade, it already attracts attention while it is switched off. As soon as this light is switched on, it produces a unique play of light within the room. A further piece of the Masters Pieces from Artemide is the Chimera. This creation by Vico Magistretti with its wavy body made of methacrylate symbolically stands for the 1960s when plastic was the material of choice.

A further floor lamp from the exclusive circle of the Artemide Masters Pieces is the Callimaco by Ettore Sottsass. The co-founder of the legendary Memphis group created a lighting object that not only stands out for the handle. The extraordinary, colourful designer of the Artemide Callimaco makes it a symbol for the non-conformist spirit that Memphis represented in the 1980s. Gio also made a contribution to the Artemide Masters Pieces. The Fato from 1969 is a geometric structure consisting of free and closed surfaces, which not only provides for interesting transitions between light and dark but which also upgrades the interior as a decorative (luminous) display case.

Ettore Sottsass for a second time: due to its top made of green methacrylate, the Artemide Pausania looks a little like a banker’s lamp from the Art Déco era. The top also houses the modern LED lamps that only require little power input to produce a powerful luminous flux of 900 lumens. At first, the Artemide Prometeo catches the eye with its monolithic look. Thanks to the Metamorfosi light technology, this floor lamp from the nineties not only offers white but also colourful light. Dichroic filters make the light emitted by several illuminants shine in red, blue or green; optionally, the user can also choose a combined light colour. A supplied remote control allows you to conveniently control the light while you are still sitting in your armchair.
 

Artemide Masters Pieces – from dynamic to fungal

The Montjuic from 1990 adds a touch extravagance to the Artemide Masters Pieces. This floor lamp by Santiago Calatrava impresses by its slim, slightly inclined body with an asymmetric lampshade made of opal methacrylate sitting on top of it. This lampshade directs the light towards the ceiling, from where it is softly and harmoniously reflected into the room. The Lesbo table lamp by Angelo Mangiarotti from 1967 takes up the shape of a mushroom. Its corpus made of hand-blown Murano glass softly diffuses the light in its environment and thereby suffuses a sideboard or a commode with atmospheric light.

The old master Michele De Lucchi is also a part of the Artemide Masters Pieces. His Noto pendant light is based on the shape of a Chinese dragon. Thanks to the flexible individual elements, it develops a presence of floating dynamics. This winner of the Red Dot Awards diffuses its pleasant light in all directions and thereby ensures welcoming ambient lighting in, for instance, a living room.
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